Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Preconference [clear filter]
Sunday, August 11
 

9:00am

Archives: Principles and Practices #1410 (Day 1 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Although they have much in common with librarians,records managers, and museum staff, archivistsmust use different practices to protect theintegrity of historical records. A strong archivesprogram puts into practice long-standing archivalprinciples. What are those principles and how doyou implement them? This workshop provides anoverview of basic archival functions, includingappraisal and accessioning, arrangement anddescription, preservation, and reference.

In this workshop you’ll:


  • Learn archives and historical records terminologyand get an overview of the bodyof knowledge needed, ethical responsibilities,and resources for continuing professionaldevelopment;

  • Learn the principles of archival organization and functions: Provenance, respect de fonds, and original order;

  • Find out about core policy statements, professional standards, and best practices, and learn how to evaluate your current program and determine needed improvements;

  • Develop the knowledge base needed to make choices for balancing access to and preservation of historical records and holdings; and

  • Gain a greater understanding of the role of the archives in fulfilling the mission of the institution.


Who should attend? Librarians, records managers, museum staff, and administrators who have responsibility for archival records but little or no archives training.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
avatar for Pam Hackbart-Dean

Pam Hackbart-Dean

Director, Special Collections Research Center, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
Pam Hackbart-Dean is currently Director of the Special Collections Research Center at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Previously she was head of Special Collections & Archives at Georgia State University and processing archivist for the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Study at the University of Georgia. | Hackbart-Dean has been active in many professional archival organizations, including the Midwest... Read More →
avatar for Anne Ostendarp

Anne Ostendarp

Multimedia Archivist, Knights of Columbus
| Anne Ostendarp is Consulting and Project Archivist. Her career in archives started in 1983 as an archives assistant. She has served as archivist in research and college library special collections settings at Dartmouth College (1992-2002), University of Connecticut (1987-1991), and Amherst College (1985-86, 1991-93). She was processing archivist at the Ford Foundation (1986-87). Anne has provided historical records consultations to public... Read More →


Sunday August 11, 2013 9:00am - Monday August 12, 2013 5:00pm
Belle Chasse
 
Monday, August 12
 

9:00am

Archives: Principles and Practices #1410 (Day 2 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Although they have much in common with librarians,records managers, and museum staff, archivistsmust use different practices to protect theintegrity of historical records. A strong archivesprogram puts into practice long-standing archivalprinciples. What are those principles and how doyou implement them? This workshop provides anoverview of basic archival functions, includingappraisal and accessioning, arrangement anddescription, preservation, and reference.

In this workshop you’ll:


  • Learn archives and historical records terminologyand get an overview of the bodyof knowledge needed, ethical responsibilities,and resources for continuing professionaldevelopment;

  • Learn the principles of archival organization and functions: Provenance, respect de fonds, and original order;

  • Find out about core policy statements, professional standards, and best practices, and learn how to evaluate your current program and determine needed improvements;

  • Develop the knowledge base needed to make choices for balancing access to and preservation of historical records and holdings; and

  • Gain a greater understanding of the role of the archives in fulfilling the mission of the institution.


Who should attend? Librarians, records managers, museum staff, and administrators who have responsibility for archival records but little or no archives training.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
avatar for Pam Hackbart-Dean

Pam Hackbart-Dean

Director, Special Collections Research Center, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
Pam Hackbart-Dean is currently Director of the Special Collections Research Center at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Previously she was head of Special Collections & Archives at Georgia State University and processing archivist for the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Study at the University of Georgia. | Hackbart-Dean has been active in many professional archival organizations, including the Midwest... Read More →
avatar for Anne Ostendarp

Anne Ostendarp

Multimedia Archivist, Knights of Columbus
| Anne Ostendarp is Consulting and Project Archivist. Her career in archives started in 1983 as an archives assistant. She has served as archivist in research and college library special collections settings at Dartmouth College (1992-2002), University of Connecticut (1987-1991), and Amherst College (1985-86, 1991-93). She was processing archivist at the Ford Foundation (1986-87). Anne has provided historical records consultations to public... Read More →


Monday August 12, 2013 9:00am - 5:00pm
Belle Chasse

9:00am

Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS)* #1411 [REVISED]
Limited Capacity seats available

Get an in-depth introduction to the key principles, concepts, and elements of Describing Archives: A Content Standard, the recently revised U.S. standard for describing archival materials and their creators. Learn how to implement and incorporate DACS into workflows for accessioning, arrangement, and description through discussions and hands-on work with a variety of exercises designed to help you identify required elements and create a variety of descriptions. This workshop focuses on application of DACS rules and concepts, which participants can integrate into local repository processes and descriptive outputs.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:


  • Articulate what DACS is (and isn’t), and how its basic principles relate to archival theory and practice;

  • Distinguish between minimal and value-added descriptions for archival materials and creators;

  • Apply DACS rules to identify and formulate required elements of archival description; and

  • Integrate DACS across the archival enterprise in processes such as accessioning, arrangement, and description.


Who should attend? Anyone whose work includes accessioning, arranging, and describing, or who supervises employees who are engaged in those functions. Past attendees will find this class useful as a refresher as well as an overview of revisions to the standard.

What should you already know? You should have a basic understanding of the theory and principles of archival arrangement and description.

The current version of the DACS publication is available free of charge as a PDF in the SAA Standards Portal. A print version will be available in the SAA Bookstore in summer 2013.Registrants must bring a copy to the workshop in order to participate successfully.

Attendance is limited to 35.

*DACS was revised by the Technical Subcommittee on Describing Archives: A Content Standard and was adopted by the SAA Council in January 2013.





Speakers
avatar for Hillel Arnold

Hillel Arnold

Lead Digital Archivist, Rockefeller Archive Center
I work on technologies that help improve access to archival materials. I'm really interested in improving the user experience throughout the research process.


Monday August 12, 2013 9:00am - 5:00pm
Oak Alley

9:00am

Digital Curation Planning and Sustainable Futures #1414
Limited Capacity seats available

Directions from the Hilton Hotel to Loyola University

Learn from the experts! In this course you’ll review the concepts, principles, and practices necessary for developing a digital curation program to effectively manage digital content - including archival records - across generations of technology. In addition, this course focuses on the advocacy, preservation planning, and policy development necessary to manage digital content far into the future.

Upon completion of this course you’ll have the core information to:


  • Develop a digital curation program;

  • Manage digital content; and

  • Advocate for a program that includes archival content and a standards-based framework to manage it into the future.


Who should attend? Administrators with oversight across the entire archival enterprise of an institution and managers who aspire to be administrators.

What should you already know? Participants are expected to have deep knowledge of archival processes, years of experience, and at least intermediate knowledge of digital archives. This course builds on the DAS course, Digital Curation:Creating an Environment for Success.

The DAS Core Competencies Addressed in this Course:

#2: Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#5: Plan for the integration of new tools or successive generations of emerging technologies, software, and media.
#6: Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.
#7: Provide dependable organization and service to designated communities across networks.

This course is one of the Transformational Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program!  (If you intend to take this course as one of the nine courses required to pursue the DAS certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course.  Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.)

Attendance is limited to 35.





Speakers
NM

Nancy McGovern

Digital Preservation Program lead, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Since 2012, Nancy Y. McGovern has been responsible for digital preservation at MIT Libraries. She directs the Digital Preservation Management (DPM) workshop series, offered fifty times since 2003. She has thirty years of experience with preserving digital content, including senior positions at ICPSR; Cornell University Library; the Open Society Archives; and the Center for Electronic Records of the U.S. National Archives. She chairs the Digital... Read More →
HT

Helen Tibbo

Alumni Distinguished Professor, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Dr. Helen R. Tibbo is an Alumni Distinguished Professor at the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), and teaches in the areas of archives and records management, digital preservation and access, appraisal, trustworthy repositories, and data curation. She developed the Archives and Records Management (ARM) Program at SILS and teaches in the SILS Post Master’s Certificate... Read More →


Monday August 12, 2013 9:00am - 5:00pm
Loyola University

9:00am

Encoded Archival Context - Corporate Bodies, Persons, & Families (EAC-CPF)* #1413
Limited Capacity seats available

Directions from the Hilton Hotel to Tulane University


How can EAC-CPF enhance your institution’s records – and how can you get started using it? In this workshop you’ll learn how to create EAC-CPF records, with hands-on application of the elements to existing data; discuss balancing existing data with additional data components as part of an implementation strategy; and examine existing projects to consider how EAC-CPF may be implemented locally, regionally, or nationally.

Upon completing this workshop you’ll have:


  • Knowledge of the structure and content of the EAC-CPF standard and the companion content standard ISAAR (CPF);

  • Explored the metadata scheme design, including elements and attributes defined to reflect that design:

    • XML techniques used to incorporate data from allied standards

    • Current XML techniques leveraged in the standard



  • Created EAC-CPF record content from existing data structures, such as the Library of Congress Name Authority File, United List of Artists Names, biographical resources, and other related sources; and

  • Exposure to EAC-CPF projects underway in the United States and internationally.


Who should attend? Practicing archivists who are interested in the development and design of the EAC-CPF standard, who want to learn more about this standard, and who want to consider how it could be implemented in their repositories or consortia.

What should you already know? Background knowledge of other encoding standards, such as MARC21 or HTML, will ensure that you have a successful learning experience.

Attendance is limited to 35.





Speakers
KM

Katherine M. Wisser

Associate Professor, Simmons College
Katherine M. Wisser is Associate Professor and co-Director of the Dual Degree program in Archives and History at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at Simmons College. Previously, she served as the Director of Instructional Services at the School of Information and Library Science (SILS), UNC-Chapel Hill and worked professionally in New Hampshire and North Carolina. She was a teaching fellow at the SILS from 2001-2009. She... Read More →


Monday August 12, 2013 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tulane University

1:00pm

EAD Hackathon #1412
Limited Capacity seats available

Directions from the Hilton Hotel to Loyola University


Have you taken the EAD workshop(s) and would love to get together with others to spend time “playing” with the Encoded Archival Description tool – just for the sake of building better metadata? At the EAD Hackathon, you’ll learn how to submit your style sheet to GitHub (https://github.com) for the benefit of all. Plus, you’ll get a chance to play with the new beta version of EAD. If you're new to EAD, please join us.

At the Hackathon you’ll:


  • Become familiar with tools such as GitHub and the new EAD help pages that are now on GitHub;

  • Experiment with the new EAD and come up with ideas to share with the EAD Task Force;

  • Experiment with EAC-CPF; and

  • Have a chance to try EAD, even if you’ve had little or no EAD experience.


Who should attend? Archivists, digital curators, IT professionals, legal professionals, librarians, museum professionals, and records managers who want to give this atypical format a try. Hackathons provide a forum for individuals and teams to come together to make innovation happen.

What should you already know? No specific knowledge is required to participate, but an interest in discussion and experimentation is a must! The agenda will be determined by the participants, not set in advance by the facilitators.

Attendance is limited to 40.





Speakers
avatar for Mark Custer

Mark Custer

Archivist / Metadata Coordinator, Yale University
Mark Custer is an archivist and metadata coordinator at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. He has been heavily involved with the implementation of ArchivesSpace at Yale University, and he is the former chair of the ArchivesSpace Public User Interface Enhancement Project. Mark is a graduate of the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University.
avatar for Krista Ferrante

Krista Ferrante

Collections Archivist, MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections
Collections Archivist at MIT Institute Archives Interested in encoding standards, digital object preservation and public awareness of the importance of preserving and making available all materials of enduring value.


Monday August 12, 2013 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Loyola University
 
Tuesday, August 13
 

9:00am

PREMIS Tutorial #1415
Limited Capacity seats available

The PREMIS Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata is a specification that provides a key piece of infrastructure for digital preservation activities and plays a vital role in enabling the effective management, discovery, and reusability of digital information. Preservation metadata provides provenance information, documents preservation activity, identifies technical features, and aids in verifying the authenticity of digital objects. PREMIS is a core set of metadata elements recommended for use in all preservation repositories, regardless of the type of materials archived, the type of institution, and the preservation strategies employed.

In this course, you’ll get an introduction to PREMIS and its data model, a walk-through of the Data Dictionary, examples of PREMIS metadata in real situations, as well as implementation considerationsparticularly using PREMIS in XML and with the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS). You’ll also explore strategies for using controlled vocabularies with PREMIS semantic units.

There will be examples of PREMIS usage and time for questions and answers.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:


  • Understand the need for preservation metadata for long-term preservation of digital objects;

  • Understand the PREMIS Data Model and how it applies to management of digital objects;

  • Have knowledge of the semantic units in the PREMIS Data Dictionary and how they apply to different categories of digital assets;

  • Be aware of issues that an institution might encounter in its collection and management of preservation metadata; and

  • Highlight a number of use cases that will assist implementers in planning their own use of preservation metadata.


Who should attend? This tutorial will benefit individuals and institutions interested in implementing PREMIS metadata for the long-term management and preservation of their digital information.

What should you already know? Participants are expected to have some involvement in and knowledge of digital preservation and some familiarity with XML and METS.

The DAS Core Competencies Addressed in this Course:

#1: Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#2: Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4: Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.
#5: Plan for the integration of new tools or successive generations of emerging technologies, software, and media.
#6: Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.

This course is one of the Tools and Services Courses of the DAS Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to take this course as one of the nine courses required to pursue the DAS certificate, you’ll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

Attendance is limited to 35.





Speakers
avatar for Karin Bredenberg

Karin Bredenberg

Technical Advisor metadata, National Archives of Sweden
Working with archival standards and specifications for use when archiving at SNA.


Tuesday August 13, 2013 9:00am - 4:30pm
Oak Alley

9:00am

Rights and Permissions: Policies for Reproduction and Reuse of Archival Holdings #1417
Limited Capacity seats available

Making our holdings available for use is fundamental to the archival mission, yet many archives attempt to control further uses in various ways. When is it appropriate for an archives to limit reuse in order to protect its interests? This one-day workshop explores the issues involved in developing an institutional policy on reproduction and reuse of holdings in order to permit responsible reuse that is consistent with the law, ethical practice, financial needs, and core mission.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:


  • Articulate reasons for controlling reuse;

  • Distinguish between copyright issues and other reasons for controlling reuse;

  • Learn about findings of empirical research into controls on reuse;

  • Understand the issues to be considered in developing an institutional policy on reproduction and reuse; and

  • Revise your institutional policies as appropriate for your situation.


Who should attend? Archivists (including managers and administrators) and staff who are responsible for working with and overseeing reproduction and permissions.

What should you already know? The instructor will assume a general understanding of copyright as it applies to archival material, such as Copyright: The Archivist and the Law or equivalent, plus experience with reprographic services, policies, and procedures in an archival institution.

Attendance is limited to 35.





Speakers
JD

Jean Dryden

University of Maryland
Jean Dryden's expertise in archives and the impact of law on archival practice has been developed over many years of experience as an archivist in the government, education, and non-profit sectors in Canada. Her primary research interest is copyright; her doctoral dissertation (University of Toronto, 2008) investigated the copyright practices of Canadian archival repositories in making their holdings available online. Upon completion of her... Read More →


Tuesday August 13, 2013 9:00am - 4:30pm
Jasperwood

9:00am

Managing Electronic Records in Archives and Special Collections #1418
Limited Capacity seats available

Get ready to focus on the skills that archives administrators and managers need to incorporate electronic records management into their institutions. You’ll discuss both the administrative and technical skills needed to successfully manage archived electronic records, allowing you to make thoughtful and convincing arguments to staff, supervisors, and stakeholders.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:


  • Describe the basic elements of an electronic records program, including policy, authenticity, storage requirements, advocacy, and management strategies;

  • Explain the issues surrounding creating policies governing the management of electronic records in your organization; and

  • Evaluate workflows, systems, storage, and tools for electronic records management that are appropriate for your organization.


Who should attend? Archivists, records managers, and special collections curators who are responsible for managing an electronic records program.

What should you already know? You should have an understanding of archival practice and workflows.

The DAS Core Competencies Addressed in this Course:

#1. Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#2. Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.
#5. Plan for the integration of new tools or successive generations of emerging technologies, software, and media.
#7. Provide dependable organization and service to designated communities across networks.

This course is one of the Transformational Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program!  If you intend to take this course as one of the nine courses required to pursue the DAS certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course.  Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

Attendance is limited to 35.





Speakers
avatar for Seth Shaw

Seth Shaw

Assistant Professor of Archival Studies, Clayton State University
Seth Shaw is an Assistant Professor of Archival Studies at Clayton State University. His teaching and research focus is on the impact of electronic records archival principles and practice. | He received his Bachelors of Science in Information Systems from Brigham Young University - Idaho in 2005 and then his Masters of Science in Information, Archives & Records Management from the University of Michigan's School of Information in 2007. From... Read More →


Tuesday August 13, 2013 9:00am - 5:00pm
Belle Chasse

9:00am

Reappraising and Deaccessioning Archival Materials from Start to Finish #1416
Limited Capacity seats available

In this workshop you’ll learn how to initiate and carry out reappraisal and deaccessioning programs and projects step-by-step! Hear about basic concepts of reappraisal and deaccessioning, like collecting data and finding repositories to accept transferred collections. Delve into larger issues of determining ownership, considering choices, and making responsible decisions. Take the opportunity to assess what your repository needs to do before beginning a reappraisal and deaccessioning project or program. In the afternoon you’ll be looking at case studies provided by the instructors and participant-submitted situations to learn how to apply SAA’s Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning to unique situations.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:


  • Take steps to reappraise and deaccession materials in an ethical, responsible, and transparent manner;

  • Apply the Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning to specific situations;

  • Explain to your administrators, superiors, and parent bodies the benefits of reappraisal and deaccessioning; and

  • Consider legal and ethical considerations when reappraising and deaccessioning collections.


Who should attend? Administrators, legal professionals, managers, practitioners, and records managers.

What should you already know? Participants with a good understanding of their own institution, including organizational structure, policies, and collections, will have an easier time completing the first activity and will find it more practical. Previous appraisal experience is useful, but not necessary.

Attendance is limited to 35.





Speakers
JB

Jeremy Brett

Processing Archivist and Curator, Science Fiction & Fantasy Research Collection, Texas A&M University Libraries
Jeremy Brett is the Processing Archivist as well as the Curator of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Research Collection at Texas A&M University. He received his M.L.S. and his M.A. in History from the University of Maryland-College Park, and a B.A. in History from George Washington University. He is a past Senior Co-Chair of the Issues & Advocacy Roundtable, and the Vice-Chair of the Privacy & Confidentiality Roundtable.
avatar for Marcella Wiget Huggard

Marcella Wiget Huggard

Archives and manuscripts coordinator, University of Kansas
Marcella was public records program supervisor at the Kansas Historical Society prior to working at the University of Kansas; she also worked on two large-scale grant-funded projects at KSHS. Prior to her time at KSHS, she was assistant archivist at Bessemer Historical Society and curator of collections at the Reno County Historical Society. She received her MA from Colorado State University and BA from Knox College, both degrees in History.


Tuesday August 13, 2013 9:00am - 5:00pm
Elmwood

10:00am

CURATEcamp SAA 2013 #1419
Limited Capacity seats available

Directions from the Hilton Hotel to Tulane University


This workshop is an unconference-style event at which participants will engage in discussions related to data curation and digital archives. In this unconventional format, participants take charge in determining learning objectives by choosing the topics and driving the discussion.  It’s an opportunity to brainstorm on current topics, explore ideas in progress or tough concepts, and share best practices.

This open forum will allow for discussions with a diverse group of professionals in a setting in which topics develop organically throughout the day. Visit http://curatecamp.org/pages/how-it-works for more information.

One of the core goals of CURATEcamp is to engage everyone in peer-to-peer learning, collaboration, and creativity to broaden the digital curation community. At CURATEcamp in New Orleans, you’ll be in a position to propose topics, ask questions, get answers, and make connections with your peers in a welcoming environment.  There are no spectators at CURATEcamp…only participants!

Who should attend? Anyone who touches digital records and wants to participate and learn in this new format.

What should you already know? You should have a basic understanding of digital collections and data sets.

Attendance is limited to 40.





Speakers
avatar for Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Digital Library Development Project Manager, ClimateQUAL Implementation Team Co-Chair, UC San Diego Library
avatar for Courtney C. Mumma

Courtney C. Mumma

Archivematica and AtoM Community Development Consultant, Artefactual Systems, Inc.
Courtney works with US and international clients and community members, development partners and open-source project groups to promote the use and ongoing development of Artefactual Systems' products, Archivematica and AtoM. She is an active conference presenter and liaison with the heritage community, and uses her extensive knowledge of digital preservation to assist institutions to use Archivematica and AtoM to preserve and provide access to... Read More →


Tuesday August 13, 2013 10:00am - 4:00pm
Tulane University