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Preconference [clear filter]
Monday, August 12
 

9:00am

Digital Curation Planning and Sustainable Futures #1414
Limited Capacity seats available

Directions from the Hilton Hotel to Loyola University

Learn from the experts! In this course you’ll review the concepts, principles, and practices necessary for developing a digital curation program to effectively manage digital content - including archival records - across generations of technology. In addition, this course focuses on the advocacy, preservation planning, and policy development necessary to manage digital content far into the future.

Upon completion of this course you’ll have the core information to:


  • Develop a digital curation program;

  • Manage digital content; and

  • Advocate for a program that includes archival content and a standards-based framework to manage it into the future.


Who should attend? Administrators with oversight across the entire archival enterprise of an institution and managers who aspire to be administrators.

What should you already know? Participants are expected to have deep knowledge of archival processes, years of experience, and at least intermediate knowledge of digital archives. This course builds on the DAS course, Digital Curation:Creating an Environment for Success.

The DAS Core Competencies Addressed in this Course:

#2: Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#5: Plan for the integration of new tools or successive generations of emerging technologies, software, and media.
#6: Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.
#7: Provide dependable organization and service to designated communities across networks.

This course is one of the Transformational Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program!  (If you intend to take this course as one of the nine courses required to pursue the DAS certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course.  Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.)

Attendance is limited to 35.





Speakers
avatar for Nancy McGovern

Nancy McGovern

SAA President; Digital Preservation Program lead, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Since 2012, Nancy Y. McGovern has been responsible for digital preservation at MIT Libraries. She directs the Digital Preservation Management (DPM) workshop series, offered fifty times since 2003. She has thirty years of experience with preserving digital content, including senior... Read More →
HT

Helen Tibbo

Alumni Distinguished Professor, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Dr. Helen R. Tibbo is an Alumni Distinguished Professor at the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), and teaches in the areas of archives and records management, digital preservation and access, appraisal, trustworthy... Read More →


Monday August 12, 2013 9:00am - 5:00pm
Loyola University
 
Tuesday, August 13
 

9:00am

PREMIS Tutorial #1415
Limited Capacity seats available

The PREMIS Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata is a specification that provides a key piece of infrastructure for digital preservation activities and plays a vital role in enabling the effective management, discovery, and reusability of digital information. Preservation metadata provides provenance information, documents preservation activity, identifies technical features, and aids in verifying the authenticity of digital objects. PREMIS is a core set of metadata elements recommended for use in all preservation repositories, regardless of the type of materials archived, the type of institution, and the preservation strategies employed.

In this course, you’ll get an introduction to PREMIS and its data model, a walk-through of the Data Dictionary, examples of PREMIS metadata in real situations, as well as implementation considerationsparticularly using PREMIS in XML and with the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS). You’ll also explore strategies for using controlled vocabularies with PREMIS semantic units.

There will be examples of PREMIS usage and time for questions and answers.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:


  • Understand the need for preservation metadata for long-term preservation of digital objects;

  • Understand the PREMIS Data Model and how it applies to management of digital objects;

  • Have knowledge of the semantic units in the PREMIS Data Dictionary and how they apply to different categories of digital assets;

  • Be aware of issues that an institution might encounter in its collection and management of preservation metadata; and

  • Highlight a number of use cases that will assist implementers in planning their own use of preservation metadata.


Who should attend? This tutorial will benefit individuals and institutions interested in implementing PREMIS metadata for the long-term management and preservation of their digital information.

What should you already know? Participants are expected to have some involvement in and knowledge of digital preservation and some familiarity with XML and METS.

The DAS Core Competencies Addressed in this Course:

#1: Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#2: Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4: Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.
#5: Plan for the integration of new tools or successive generations of emerging technologies, software, and media.
#6: Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.

This course is one of the Tools and Services Courses of the DAS Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to take this course as one of the nine courses required to pursue the DAS certificate, you’ll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

Attendance is limited to 35.





Tuesday August 13, 2013 9:00am - 4:30pm
Oak Alley

9:00am

Managing Electronic Records in Archives and Special Collections #1418
Limited Capacity seats available

Get ready to focus on the skills that archives administrators and managers need to incorporate electronic records management into their institutions. You’ll discuss both the administrative and technical skills needed to successfully manage archived electronic records, allowing you to make thoughtful and convincing arguments to staff, supervisors, and stakeholders.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:


  • Describe the basic elements of an electronic records program, including policy, authenticity, storage requirements, advocacy, and management strategies;

  • Explain the issues surrounding creating policies governing the management of electronic records in your organization; and

  • Evaluate workflows, systems, storage, and tools for electronic records management that are appropriate for your organization.


Who should attend? Archivists, records managers, and special collections curators who are responsible for managing an electronic records program.

What should you already know? You should have an understanding of archival practice and workflows.

The DAS Core Competencies Addressed in this Course:

#1. Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#2. Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.
#5. Plan for the integration of new tools or successive generations of emerging technologies, software, and media.
#7. Provide dependable organization and service to designated communities across networks.

This course is one of the Transformational Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program!  If you intend to take this course as one of the nine courses required to pursue the DAS certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course.  Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

Attendance is limited to 35.





Speakers
avatar for Seth Shaw

Seth Shaw

Application Developer, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Seth Shaw is an Application Developer in the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries supporting Special Collections & Archives. Previously, he was the Electronic Records Archivist for Duke University Archives and an Assistant Professor of Archival Studies for Clayton State Univ... Read More →


Tuesday August 13, 2013 9:00am - 5:00pm
Belle Chasse